Interview with David Pierce(@piercedavid)

102!

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Today's New Years Eve interview is with David Pierce, senior reviews editor at the Verge. Enough said? Nope. David also shares my name and runs a cool blog here.

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What is it like working at the Verge?

It's incredible. The whole Verge staff is full of the smartest, hardest-working, most fun people I know, and we're lucky enough to all work at a place where we get to experiment, try new things, think about things in different ways, and fail constantly while we try to figure out the best way to do things. It's also a great place to work just because of the time we're living in. We always say that "tech culture is becoming culture," and we're fascinated by that — Facebook's not technology anymore. It's culture. Same with Twitter, and Instagram, and smartphones, and tablets. Gadgets aren't a thing we use anymore, they're a part of our lives. They're how we communicate, how we create, how we consume, and so much more. I love that I get to spend my time watching this shift happen, writing about what's happening and what it means, and publishing it on a site that's so interested in this new way we live in 2012 and beyond. 

What does your workspace look like?

It's a MESS. I have a cheap, crappy Ikea desk, with anywhere from one to twenty gadgets on it at a time. I kind of feel like I live in an exploded Best Buy all the time, with tablets and PCs and smartphones and cameras all around me. I love it, and I wouldn't trade it for anything, but I desperately need someone to help me organize. I work from a 13-inch Macbook Air with a 21-inch external monitor, though I'm increasingly getting rid of the second monitor – only having 13 inches of screen helps me focus on one or two tasks, not my usual 56.

What does a typical day in the life of David Pierce consist of?

I spend most of my mornings editing, whether it's reviews, features, or news. Afternoons are far too often controlled by meetings with companies or my co-workers, but I guess that's kind of a necessary evil of the working world. When I'm not in meetings, I'm usually playing with a new gadget (actually I'm almost always playing with a new gadget) or writing a review. I'm a bit of a night-owl, though, and I've found I get my best writing done between about 9PM and 2AM. So I tend to leave the office, get some dinner, and sit down with my computer on my lap and whatever I'm testing strewn around me, trying to get a few hours of concerted writing done.

You have reviewed the new iPod Touch, buy or not? Why?

Hard to say, honestly. I love the iPod touch, and recommend it to a lot of people – it has a great camera, a great screen, the huge App Store, and a lot of fun uses cases — but I'm also a huge fan of the iPad mini (I bought one myself). The touch is certainly more portable, and it's $30 cheaper, but having 7.8 inches of screen to use for drawing or playing a game really does make a huge difference. The iPod touch used to be the iOS gateway drug, the thing that got you hooked enough to convince you to buy a Mac or an iPhone; now the iPad mini does the same thing. You really can't go wrong.

What can we expect from you and the Verge in the future?

Lots! We believe in video, we believe in depth, we believe in design — we're hopefully going to continue to get better at all of those things going forward, and everything from news to reviews to features will be a part of that. We're also always expanding the things we think about. Again, as tech culture bleeds into "culture culture" (a favorite Verge phrase), technology touches and affects more and more aspects of our lives. We're interested in every one of those aspects, and exploring how they work and how they're changing. The Verge isn't just about gadgets; it's about what's cool, and what's next. What's on the verge, if you will :)

Here is the desktop background I designed for David. Click the image to buy it.

David Silverman